Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) - Periodontal Therapy

+ Why are my gums bleeding?

Gums can bleed for a number of reasons. Sometimes the problem is as simple as aggressive brushing, but sometimes bleeding is the first sign of periodontal (gum) disease. If you've noticed blood in the sink when you brush, please call our office to schedule a visit so we can determine what's behind it.

Many patients are brushing their teeth diligently but aren't using good technique. Brushing too hard or using a toothbrush that is too firm can cause damage to gum tissue and even your enamel. It can also lead to gum recession, which exposes your sensitive tooth roots and can lead to an increased risk of decay. Our skilled dental hygienists are happy to review your technique with you and help you learn better habits.

Periodontal disease can develop for quite some time before you notice symptoms like bleeding gums. This is one of the reasons why regular visits to our Frisco dental office are so important. During a regular cleaning and exam, we check for signs of gum disease that you might not notice initially. This allows you to get a head start on treating the condition before it begins to cause problems. Other signs that might indicate developing gum disease include:

  • Persistant bad breath
  • Gum recession
  • Swollen or red gums
  • Tender gums

+ Why won't my bad breath go away?

Chronic bad breath is often one of the first signs of periodontal disease, unfortunately.

Tartar and the pockets that develop around your teeth are the perfect home for bacteria, and just like in other parts of your body, bacteria tend to emit odor. If brushing your teeth and using mouthwash isn't eliminating your bad breath, it's time to schedule an appointment for a cleaning. Our hygienists are trained to notice the warning signs of periodontal disease, and we'll work together to create a treatment plan that addresses your needs and stops the progress of gum disease in its tracks.

If your gum disease is still in the early stages, improved home care habits and a professional cleaning might be all it takes to set you back on track. If your disease has progressed further, however, we may need to consider deeper cleaning treatments to remove tartar from beneath the gumline and help the pockets between your gums and teeth heal. This deeper cleaning, known as scaling and root planing, removes built-up tartar and bacteria from beneath the gumline. Once this irritation is gone, your gums will fit tighter around your teeth, making it harder for bacteria to return. We may also recommend a local antibiotic to help kill off remaining bacteria.